CPO 2001 Introduction to Comparative Politics

Course Day & Times:

  • Monday / Wednesday 6thperiod, Little 0101
  • Section (various)

Course objectives, description and goals:

This course is designed to provide students a comprehensive introduction to Comparative Politics through the discussion of a broad range of thematic topics. These are supplemented with a selection of academic readings and real world case studies from various regions of the world. In general, Mondays will be dedicated to the basic concepts of the week’s readings (ECP), Wednesdays to the related scholarly readings (ERCP) and Thursdays/Fridays (sections) will focus on the comparative cases (CCP) as a platform for applying what was learned in the other readings.

Prerequisites

None – this is an introductory course

Attendance

Note that class attendance is required for this course. This includes attendance at lectures and weekly discussion sections. Attendence will be monitored as necessary during lectures (roll) and through participation in in-class assignments/quizzes.During lectures the professor may also occasionally provide insider information for exams and otherwise incentivize regular attendance. Attendence and participation grades in sections will be determined by the section instructor and may vary between sections.

Repeated absences will unquestionably affect your performance on exams since they will be based on class lectures, section discussions, as well as readings. Lecture notes and other related course materials discussed or distributed during class will NOT be posted online or otherwise distributed (except in the case of an excused absence).

According to the Office of the University Registrar, “acceptable reasons for absence from class include illness, serious family emergencies, special curricular requirements (e.g., judging trips, field trips, and professional conferences), military obligation, severe weather conditions, religious holidays and participation in official university activities such as music performances, athletic competition or debate. Absences from class for court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury duty or subpoena) must be excused.”

For further information about the University of Florida’s attendance policy, please see the current Undergraduate Catalogue (http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/catalog/policies/regulationattendance.html).

Academic Honesty

Academic dishonesty, including cheating on exams and plagiarism, will not be tolerated. Any student engaging in such activities will be dealt with in accordance with University policy. It is your responsibility to know what constitutes plagiarism, and what the university policies are.

If you have doubts, we please discuss with the professor immediately (after the infringement is too late). Please refer to the current Undergraduate Catalogue for more information on the Student Honor code (http://www.registrar.ufl.edu/catalog/policies/students.html). Students who have questions about these policies, should contact the undergraduate advisement center for additional information.

Students with Disabilities

If you have a disability that may affect your performance in this class, you should contact the Dean of Students Office so that special arrangements can be made to accommodate you. It is your responsibility to do so at the beginning of the semester and to communicate directly with the professor during the first week of classes (or as soon as the disability occurs).

Grading & Assessment

Students are responsible for completing all readings for the topic in question prior to attending the class. Short quizzes on assigned readings will be held most weeks. There will be no make-ups for missed quizzes; however students may drop their two lowest quizzes.

  • Midterms (20% each = 40%)
  • Final Exam (35%)
  • Quizzes (10%)
  • Attendence (5%)
  • Participation in discussion sections (10%)

Grading Scale

94% – 100% = A 90% – 93% = A- 87% – 89% = B+ 84% – 86% = B 80% – 83% = B-

77% – 79% = C+ 74% – 76% = C 70% – 73% = C- 67% – 69% = D+ 64% – 66% = D

60% – 63% = D- < 60% = F

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO MAKE CHANGES TO THIS SYLLABUS AS NEEDED DURING THE COURSE OF THE SEMESTER. AS MUCH ADVANCE WARNING AS POSSIBLE WILL BE PROVIDED TO STUDENTS. CHANGES CAN BE MADE TO THE SCHEDULE, ASSIGNED READING OR OTHER ASPECTS AS DEEMED NECESSARY. NO CHANGES WILL BE MADE TO GRADING SCALE OR CORE UF POLICIES AS NOTED ABOVE. ***

REQUIRED BOOK & MATERIALS

  • O’Neill, P., Essentials of Comparative Politics (4thEdition) ECP
  • O’Neill, P. and R. Rogowski, Essential Readings in Comparative Politics (4thEdition) ERCP
  • O’Neill, P., K. Fields, and D. Share, Cases in Comparative Politics (4thEdition) CCP

This class will use “clickers” for in class assignments and quizzes.

  • Students can purchase clickers directly from TurningPoint (http://store.turningtechnologies.com) using the code “4ufl” (without the quotes) or they can purchase them at local textbook stores (availability varies).
  • Alternatively students can use ResponseWare, a web-based virtual clicker to participate in the class with any web-enabled smart phone, laptop, or anything with a web browser. There are ResponseWare applications specifically designed for Apple iOS devices, Android devices, and Blackberries. If using ResponseWare students must purchase a ResponseWare license ($16 annually) from the Turning Technologies Store(use the code 4UFL) if they do not already have one for this year.
  • Once students have a license they must create an account on http://rwpoll.comusing the license code just purchased.
  • Students must register their clicker/responseware ID with e-learning (Sakai) via assignment 1

 

COURSE SCHEDULE AND REQUIRED READINGS

WEEK 1 (January 7 & 9): Introduction to the Course and Comparative Politics

  • What is comparative politics
  • The comparative method

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 1
  • ERCP Chapter 1 (first two readings)
  • CCP Chapter 1

WEEK 2 (January 14 & 16): The origin and Role of States

  • What is a state?
  • The ‘modern’ state
  • Comparing states

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 2
  • ERCP Chapter 2 – ALL
  • CCP Chapter 2

WEEK 3 (MLK Holiday & January 23): Nations, Nationality and Identity I

  • Ethnic identity vs. national identity
  • Citizenship

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 3
  • CCP Chapter 3

WEEK 4 (January 28 & 30): Nations, Nationality and Identity II

  • Ethnic and nationalist conflict
  • Political identity and ideology

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 3
  • ERCP Chapter 3 – (1) Fearon and Laitin; (2) Hobsbawm; (3) Baldwin and Huber
  • CCP Chapter 3

WEEK 5 (February 4 & 6):Political Economy

  • Systems of political economy
  • Evaluating political-economic systems

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 4
  • ERCP Chapter 4 – (1) Smith;(2)  North; (3) Mankiw
  • CCP Chapter 6

WEEK 6 (February 11 & 13): Review and Midterm I

  • Review

Readings:

  • Catch-up & Review

WEEK 7 (February 18 & 20): Democracy and Democratic Regimes

  • Democracy and democratization
  • Institutions and political systems (variations on a theme)

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 5
  • ERCP Chapter 5 – (1) Lijphart; (2) Schmitter and Karl; (3) Stephan, Linz and Yadav
  • CCP Chapters 4

WEEK 8 (February 25 & 27): Non-Democratic Regimes

  • Origins and characteristics of non-democratic governance
  • Types of non-democratic systems

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 6
  • ERCP Chapter 6 – (1) Linz and Stapan; (2) Levitsky and Lucan; (3) Diamond
  • CCP Chapters 10 & 13

WEEK 9 (March 4 & 6): SPRING BREAK

WEEK 10 (March 11 & 13): Political Violence

  • Origins of political violence
  • Types of political violence

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 7
  • ERCP Chapter 7 – (1) Skocpol; (2) Kuran; (3) Goldstone
  • CCP Chapter 14

WEEK 11 (March 18 & 20): Advanced Democracies

  • Defining and understanding ‘advanced democracies’
  • New modes of sovereignty, identity and political values

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 8
  • ERCP Chapter 8 – (1) Przeworski; (2) Duverger; (3) Acemoglu, Johnson, Robinson and Yared
  • CCP Chapter 5

WEEK 12 (March 25 & 27): Review and Midterm II

  • Review

Readings:

  • Catch-up & Review

WEEK 13 (April 1 & 3): Communism and Post-Communism

  • Communism: ideal versus reality
  • Post-communism – political, economic and social transformations

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 9
  • ERCP Chapter 9 – (1) Marx and Engels; (2) Bunce and Wolchik; (3) Gat
  • CCP Chapters 7 & 8

WEEK 14 (April 8 & 10): Less developed and Newly Industrializing Countries

  • Defining and understanding ‘less-developed’ countries (origins and implication)
  • Industrialization and democracy

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 10
  • ERCP Chapter 10 – (1) Collier and Gunning; (2) Krugman; (3) Acemoglu and Johnson
  • CCP Chapter 9 & 12

WEEK 15 (April 15 & 17): Globalization

  • Defining ‘globalization’
  • Evaluating globalization

Readings:

  • ECP Chapter 11
  • ERCP Chapter 11 – (1) Florida; (2) Jiang; (3) The Economist
  • CCP Chapter 11

WEEK 16 (April 22 & 24): Conclusions and Review

  • Review

Readings:

  • Catch-up & Review