Roberto L. Abreu

Assistant Professor, Counseling Psychology Area

Areas of Interest/Research

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My research explores ways in which marginalized communities resist systemic oppression and promote bienestar colectivo (collective well-being), with a particular focus on Latinx communities, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) and gender nonbinary individuals, and the intersection of Latinx and LGBTQ and gender nonbinary individuals and communities. Specifically, my research seeks to answer the following three questions: (1) how does systemic oppression (e.g., restrictions to resources, sociopolitical events, laws and policies) impacts the well-being of marginalized communities; (2) how do Latinx communities use cultural values and beliefs to accept, affirm, and celebrate their LGBTQ and gender nonbinary individuals; (3) how do culturally-affirming interventions promote bienestar colectivo among Latinx and LGBTQ and gender nonbinary individuals and communities? At its core, my work is guided by counseling psychology values such as social justice, person-environment interactions, growth, resilience, and resistance. A significant portion of my research uses advanced qualitative methodologies to explore the experiences of marginalized communities for which existing measures do not accurately capture their experiences.

Background

I am currently an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida (UF). Prior to joining the UF Department of Psychology I was a tenure-track Assistant Professor at Tennessee State University (TSU), Counseling Psychology program. I completed my Ph.D. at the University of Kentucky (UK) and an APA-accredited pre-doctoral internship at the Federal Medical Center in Lexington (FMC-LEX; Federal Bureau of Prisons). Prior to my doctoral training, I obtained my masters in Counselor Education, Clinical Mental Health Track from Florida International University (FIU). I have had the privilege of being mentored by Queer, Latinx, Black, and other POC (specifically woman-identified) scholars, clinicians, and advocates who have shaped how I interact with my research, mentoring style, and teaching approaches. They have modeled for me the power of culture, collectivism, healing, and cultural humility.

Contact Information

Email: rabreu26@ufl.edu